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  • In mountaineering in the United States, a thirteener is a mountain that exceeds 13,000 feet above mean sea level, similar to the more familiar "fourteeners," which exceed 14,000 feet. In most instances, "thirteeners" refers only to those peaks between 13,000 and 13,999 feet in elevation. The importance of thirteeners is greatest in Colorado, which has the majority of such peaks in North America with over 600 of them. Despite the daunting number of peaks, a few dedicated peak baggers have successfully managed to climb all of Colorado's thirteeners. Thirteeners are also significant in states whose highpoints fall between 13,000 and 13,999 feet. Regarding whether or not peaks in excess of 13,999 feet should be considered as "thirteeners", this article will count them as such for statistical purposes, but concentrate its focus on those peaks less than 14,000 feet since the higher peaks are already covered in the fourteeners list. Not all summits over 13,000 feet qualify as thirteeners, but only those summits that mountaineers consider to be independent. Objective standards for independence include topographic prominence and isolation, or a combination. However thirteener lists do not always consistently use such objective rules. A rule commonly used by mountaineers in the contiguous United States is that a peak must have at least 300 feet of prominence to qualify. According to the Mountaineering Club of Alaska, it is standard in Alaska to use a 500 ft prominence rule rather than a 300 foot rule. These are the standards applied for the lists below. Wikipedia

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