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<p>Pacta sunt servanda (Latin for "agreements must be kept"), is a brocard, a basic principle of civil law and of international law.
In its most common sense, the principle refers to private contracts, stressing that contained clauses are law between the parties, and implies that nonfulfilment of respective obligations is a breach of the pact.
In civil law jurisdictions this principle is related to the general principle of correct behavior in commercial practice — including the assumption of good faith — is a requirement for the efficacy of the whole system, so the eventual disorder is sometimes punished by the law of some systems even without any direct penalty incurred by any of the parties. However, common law jurisdictions usually do not have the principle of good faith in commercial contracts, therefore it is inappropriate to state that pacta sunt servanda includes the principle of good faith.
With reference to international agreements, "every treaty in force is binding upon the parties to it and must be performed by them in good faith." Pacta sunt servanda is related to good faith, while pacta sunt servanda does not equate with good faith. This entitles states to require that</p>

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