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  • Tros horses are both characters and fictional objects in The Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional unvierse and the Thieves World shared fictional universe. Tros horses are also characters in Greek mythology and especially in the Iliad fictional universe. Tros horses were originally given to Tros, founder of Troy, by Zeus after Zeus abducted Ganymede from Mount Ida to mollify Tros after Zeus took Ganymede for his eromenos. These Tros horses were said to be so fast they could run over water. Thereafter, the finest horses in the ancient world were said be from Troy, bred from Zeus's original stallions. Heracles owned them. Diomedes stole them. In the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe, Abarsis brings first one, then two more Tros horses to Tempus. These horses are the foundation stallions of the Sacred Band of Stepsons breeding program. They are man-killers (but not, like Diomedes', man-eaters) and they know the future. Tempus rides one in the first Sacred Band story (Vashanka's Minion, in Thieves' World #2, 1980). When it is killed in battle, Tempus gets two more from Abarsis and gives the care of one to Jihan. Later in the series, NIkodemos rides one and the Sacred Band of Stepsons establish a stock farm in Free Nisibis. From the novel "The Sacred Band": "The two stallions, the silver and the black, represent the equine god (whomsoever horses pray to) in this ritual so ancient that no one knows what god to thank. Thank Poseidon, say the Thebans; and Epona, the Greek goddess. Thank Stormbringer, Jihan says. So many gods claim the horse, perhaps the finest creation under heaven. Man and horse have worked together longer than either can remember. But these two stallions know their brothers, and paw the ground and trumpet their grief and thanks to heaven. It must be enough. It always has been: horses know what to say for horses; men know what to say for men, when life has fled and spirits soar and the bereft are left behind, tethered to the earth."
  • Tros horses are the Sacred Band's preferred warhorses in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe and the Thieves' World shared fictional universe. Tros horses were first bred by Tros, founder of Troy, and consider to be the best horses in the ancient world. As such, they figure in the Iliad and Greek mythology. On Tempus's request, Abarsis, Slaughter Priest, sends him a Tros horse from Abarsis's farm in Syr. When Tempus's first Tros stallion is killed in a Sanctuary skirmish, Abarsis personally brings Tempus a replacement. This stallion later becomes the foundation sire of the Sacred Band of Stepsons warhorse breeding program. Tros horses can share the god-given speed of any more-than-mortal rider. They are trained as man-killers although, in the Sacred Band of Stepsons, they are not fed on human flesh as Diomedes fed those he stole from Heracles. In the Janet Morris story, "A Man and His God," (1981) when Abarsis is killed, Tempus inherits a second Tros horse, whose care he gives to Jihan. Tros horse intelligence, speed and stamina make them highly prized by cavalrymen. Tros horses may question their owners decisions; they sometimes know the future and prompt their riders as to the safest course of action. Many Tros foals are born black and turn progressively grayer with age, until they are white. Tempus allows Niko to breed his Askelonian mare to Tempus's Tros, and the resulting foal is born at the beginning of Janet Morris's novel, "Beyond Wizardwall" (1986). Owning a Tros colt becomes Lysis the Theban's fondest desire in "The Sacred Band" (Janet Morris, Chris Morris; 2010).
  • Trôs horses are the Sacred Band's preferred warhorses in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe and the Thieves' World shared fictional universe. Trôs horses were first bred by Trôs, founder of Troy, and consider to be the best horses in the ancient world. As such, they figure in the Iliad and Greek mythology. On Tempus's request, Abarsis, Slaughter Priest, sends him a Trôs horse from Abarsis's farm in Syr. When Tempus's first Trôs stallion is killed in a Sanctuary skirmish, Abarsis personally brings Tempus a replacement. This stallion later becomes the foundation sire of the Sacred Band of Stepsons warhorse breeding program. Trôs horses can share the god-given speed of any more-than-mortal rider. They are trained as man-killers although, in the Sacred Band of Stepsons, they are not fed on human flesh as Diomedes fed those he stole from Heracles. In the Janet Morris story, "A Man and His God," (1981) when Abarsis is killed, Tempus inherits a second Trôs horse, whose care he gives to Jihan. Trôs horse intelligence, speed and stamina make them highly prized by cavalrymen. Trôs horses may question their owners decisions; they sometimes know the future and prompt their riders as to the safest course of action. Many Trôs foals are born black and turn progressively grayer with age, until they are white. Tempus allows Niko to breed his Askelonian mare to Tempus's Trôs, and the resulting foal is born at the beginning of Janet Morris's novel, "Beyond Wizardwall" (1986). Owning a Trôs colt becomes Lysis the Theban's fondest desire in "The Sacred Band" (Janet Morris, Chris Morris; 2010).
  • A Tros horse may be either a fictional character or a fictional object in The Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional unvierse and the Thieves World shared fictional universe. Tros horses are also characters in Greek mythology and especially in the Iliad fictional universe. Tros horses were originally given to Tros, founder of Troy, by Zeus after Zeus abducted Ganymede from Mount Ida to mollify Tros after Zeus took Ganymede for his eromenos. These Tros horses were said to be so fast they could run over water. Thereafter, the finest horses in the ancient world were said be from Try, bred from Zeus's original stallions. Heracles owned them. Diomedes stole them. In the Sacred Band of Stepsons unvierse, Abarsis brings first one, then two more Tros horses to Tempus. These horses are the foundation stallions of the Sacred Band of Stepsons breeding program. They are man-killers (but not, like Diomedes', man-eaters) and they know the future. Tempus rides one in the first Sacred Band story (Vashanka's Minion, in Thieves' World #2, 1980). When it is killed in battle, Tempus gets two more from Abarsis and gives the care of one to Jihan. Later in the series, NIkodemos rides one and the Sacred Band of Stepsons establish a stock farm in Free Nisibis..
  • Trôs horses are both characters and fictional objects in The Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe and the Thieves World shared fictional universe, as well as in Homer's Iliad and elsewhere in Greek mythology. Trôs horses were given first to Trôs, founder of Troy, by Zeus. These horses descended from the line bred by Trôs were considered the finest in the world. Diomedes stole a pair and fed them on human flesh. In the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe, Abarsis, Slaughter Priest, brings one, then two more, Trôs horses to Tempus and from those he creases a stock farm. Like the Trôs horses in Greek mythology, Tempus's Trôs are trained to kill -- but not, like Diomedes Trôs horses, fed on human flesh. Trôs horses were said in Greek mythology to be so fast they could run on water, and precognitive: they could tell the future. The breed was primarily white -- the color of horses of the gods in Greek mythology. Tempus's Trôs horses are usually white, but born black and lighten with age. War horses were trained to kill men either by biting, kicking, or running over their targets and could ridden without bridles and cued by the leg; the remnants of such ancient military training for war horses can still be seen in today's dressage horses.
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